Judge Profiles on CourtListener Now Show Oral Arguments Heard

We’re proud to share that we’ve now linked together our database of judges and our database of oral argument recordings. This means that as of now if you look at the profile page for a judge, you may see a list of oral argument recordings for cases that judge heard.

For example, on the page for Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there is a new section that looks like this:

Example screenshot of RBG

Ginsburg has participated in hundreds of oral arguments that we have in our system.

Clicking on the button at the bottom takes you back to our database of oral argument recordings where you can further refine your search. If the judge is active, there is an icon in the upper right that lets you subscribe to a podcast of the cases heard by that judge. At this time, these features are only available for the Supreme Court and for jurisdictions where the judges for specific cases are provided by the court website. We hope to expand this in the future.

To our knowledge, a linkage like this has never previously existed on any system, and we hope that it will make research and exploration faster and easier for our users …

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Judge Profiles on CourtListener Now Have Campaign Finance Information from the National Institute on Money In State Politics

We’re proud to share that as of today we’ve added campaign finance data to our database of judges. This update links judges in the CourtListener system to their fundraising profiles in the FollowTheMoney.org database, allowing researchers and members of the public a new way to understand judges elected in State Supreme Court jurisdictions. This work was made possible by a prototype grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Using this system, you can easily see the sources of money that a judge received as part of an election, and you can put it side by side with all of the data that we have already gathered about that judge, such as the decisions they’ve written, the positions they’ve held professionally and in the judiciary, and their biographical information.

For example, on the page for Judge Tom Parker, there is a new section that looks like this:

Example screenshot

Tom Parker has raised approximately $2.1M dollars.

To our knowledge, it has never previously been possible to research the decisions written by a judge side by side with the money they’ve received. We invite researchers and journalists to use this information to uncover interesting …

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Judge Profiles on CourtListener Now Show the Cases Authored by Each Judge

When we launched our judicial database, we shared our plan to show the cases written by each judge. As of today, we’re pleased to share that we’ve launched the first iteration of that endeavor. If you pull up any judge, say, Sonia Sotomayor, you’ll see a new section at the bottom that looks like this:

This listing provides the five most important opinions by the judge, and you can click the button at the bottom to see all of the cases they wrote or participated in. Clicking the button takes you to our search results, where you can slice and dice the data, choosing, for example, to see only their opinions from the Second Circuit, or their Supreme Court Cases.

In the search results and in the list on the judge profile page, the opinions are ordered by relevance, using our CiteGeist relevance engine. This highlights the cases that have been cited the most frequently by the most important cases.

Finally, you can now get an RSS feed for any active judge in our system, enabling you to keep up with anything they write. To do so, click the RSS icon (), and configure it with your RSS …

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More Information about our Judicial Database and Some Responses to Feedback

Robert Ambrogi recently wrote an article about our new judicial database for his LawSites blog. In his article, he makes a few concrete observations about our judicial database, and I want to use these observations as a launching point to talk some more about what we have made, why it is useful, and what we are working on next.

The two observations Robert makes are:

  1. Our page for Justice Robert Cordy is sparse compared to the same page on Ballotpedia.

  2. Scalia’s end date was not set for his time on the Supreme Court, and his education data was not quite correct.

These kinds of observations are really important to us, and it shows that we still have work to do building and explaining our work.

On Sparseness

To the first observation about Robert Cordy, our response is that we’re building a database, not a more free-form wiki. Unlike the incredible work Ballotpedia is doing, which allows almost any kind of information, our work is focused on gathering specific facts about judges and appointing officials. This approach has pros and cons, and Robert is fair to point out that our data about this important judge is fairly sparse. He …

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Free Law Project and Princeton/Columbia Researchers Launch First-of-its-Kind Judicial Database

A screenshot of President, Judge Taft

President Taft’s Biography Page

Today we’re extremely proud and excited to be launching a comprehensive database of judges and the judiciary, to be linked to Courtlistener’s corpus of legal opinions authored by those judges. We hope that this database, its APIs, and its bulk data will become a valuable tool for attorneys and researchers across the country. This new database has been developed with support from the National Science Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, in conjunction with Elliott Ash of Princeton University and Bentley MacLeod of Columbia University.

At launch, the database has nearly 8,500 judges from federal and state courts, all of which are available via our APIs, in bulk data, and via a new judicial search interface that we’ve created.

The database is aimed to be comprehensive, including as many facts about as many judges as possible. At the outset, we are collecting the following kinds of information about the judges:

  • Biographical information including their full name, race, gender, birth and death dates and locations, and any aliases or nicknames that a judge may have.

  • Their educational information including which schools they went to, when they went, and …

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